Lunatics with friends

AZ Chillin

Skateboarding is fun and I love it, but there are moments when it makes me feel like a looney. I scream and yell, snap at people, and have no care whatsoever for other people around me. It amazes me how I can do this and still have friends, and how people can put up with me acting like a madman.

Something I love about skateboarding is the mutual understanding that we have with each other. We understand the struggle of suffering through a trick and all the frustration that comes with it. Everyone that skates has their moments of battling a trick and becoming aggravated as a result of it, so they understand and aren’t necessarily surprised if someone starts acting a little crazy. Skateboarders can act like looneys and still have friends because we all have experienced the struggle and can relate with it.

In everyday life, we also have our moments of life getting the best of us, causing us to do stupid things. In spite of these moments, the Creator who knows everything about us and every wicked thought of ours still calls us his friend. Jesus says in John 15:15, “No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you.” Just like a skateboarder can have friends because they understand the struggle, He too can call us His because He understands ours. Hebrews 4:15-16, speaking of Jesus says, “For we do not have a hight priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.” Because God became man, lived among us and dealt with the same temptations as we do, he can relate with us and even offer aid. 

We all have our moments of acting a little crazy and doing stupid things. Without our friends that understand our struggles we wouldn’t have any friends for very long, and without a God that understands our frustration, pain, and sorrow, we wouldn’t have a very loving or accepting God.

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